About your Search

20110301
20110331
SHOW
Today 40
( more )
STATION
CSPAN 61
FOXNEWS 41
WBAL (NBC) 34
CSPAN2 26
WJZ (CBS) 25
CNN 20
WRC (NBC) 19
KGO (ABC) 18
KNTV (NBC) 17
MSNBC 17
KPIX (CBS) 15
WMAR (ABC) 13
WTTG 12
WJLA (ABC) 9
KQED (PBS) 8
KTVU (FOX) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 378
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 378 (some duplicates have been removed)
assist in japan after the huge earthquake and tsunami. >>> also, conflicting reports on a possible nuclear meltdown there. what's actually happening? >>> all of this causing a sizeable economic impact in japan, the u.s. and beyond. you're in the cnn news room. i'm fredricka witfield. we'll get to all of those angles in japan and beyond. but first, a look at some other top stories. in the middle east, yemeni security forces fired guns and tear gas at protesters outside sanaa university today. at least 110 people were hurt. protesters are angry over high unemployment and what they see as government corruption and a lack of political freedom. >>> two men with ties to egypt's former leader have been arrested for orchestrating this assault on protesters in cairo's tahrir square. armed attackers charged through the crowd on horses and camels last month. nine days later, hosni mubarak was overthrown. >>> and in the u.s., new york police and the ntsb are investigating a bus crash that killed 14 people. there are conflicting reports about what caused the bus to flip and swerve into a pole y
the biggest earthquake and tsunami in japan. aftershocks are a given, but the latest jolt with the preliminary magnitude of 6.4 was apparently not an aftershock at all but a new earthquake in its own right. the quake on friday and most of the tremors since have been northeast of the capital. that's where the loss, the devastation, they're simply too much to bear. the official death toll stands at 3,373 with more than twice that number officially listed as missing. the real numbers are unknown, certainly much higher. here's a more solid number for you. 91, that's the latest count of countries big and small offering some kind of help, according to japan's foreign ministry. through it all the most immediate crisis is the fukushima daichi nuclear plant. all three reactors that were online at the time of the quake have endured explosions in the building that housed them. earlier today a fire broke out in a building that houses a fourth reactor and the radiation went into the atmosphere. the fire is out now. the government says radiation levels at the plant are no longer harmful to human health. tha
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
>>> more devastation in japan this morning, as the death toll from that massive quake and tsunami rises. >> also, tens of thousands of people are forced out of their homes amid fears of a nuclear meltdown. >>> fundraising efforts are underway to help the people hurt by that devastating earthquake in japan. >>> and good morning, everyone. welcome to mornings on 2. it is sunday, march 13. >> we do have ktvu's crews here, and in tokyo. we're going to hear from them in a moment. >> first, let's check in with rosemary. >> sunrising at 7:24. still dark out there. in addition to clouds outside our door. that ahead of a storm. the sunrising at 7:24. the best news about that, the sun setting at 7:15. with cloudy conditions out there, we are warmer than we started yesterday. we're tracking the storm, and we'll talk about the wet active pattern, expected as we move through next week as well. all of that coming up in just a few moments. >>> this morning, there are near fears the death toll from the disaster could go over 10,000. this is new video that shows the severity of the disasters in th
'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
>>> good morning. breaking news. a major 8.9 magnitude earthquake rocks japan triggering a powerful tsunami. the wall of water up to 33 feet high pushing homes and cars miles. at least 32 people are dead so far. there is a tsunami warning in hawaii and parts of the u.s. west coast today friday, march hawaii and parts of the u.s. west coast today friday, march 11, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this friday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm ann curry in for matt. this was a powerful earthquake. the images are stunning out of japan. it shows the tsunami sweeping inland, some 60 miles over farmland in sendai japan, 200 miles north of tok yochlt cars, housings, buildings being swept out with this massive wave. >> it started with an 8.9 magnitude quake that hit around 2:45 p.m. local time. it is the largest quake in japan's recorded history and the fifth strongest quake in the world in the past 111 years. there have been at least 19 aftershocks, including several stronger than last month's devastating quake in new zealand. a tsunami warnin
kneejerk reactions that didn't seem to take into account the new nuances of the crisis japan is experiencing. the fact is that the idea of more nuclear energy was just starting to gain ground in the united states, given the interest in clean, abundant and cheap energy. that nuclear renaissance in america is now in danger. right now one-fifth of america's electricity comes from 104 nuclear reactors. they're expensive. companies were loathed to build them, given the tangle of regulations so the federal government offered loan guarantees to get operators to invest their money. president obama is asking for $36 billion for nuclear power in this year's proposed budget. 12 applications right now for construction and licenses. but real safety issues during unforeseen catastrophic events like what happened in japan will have to be addressed by the industry. we still need alternatives to oil and coal, but we'll have to see whether more nuclear generated electricity is part of our future. that's it for me now. brooke baldwin takes over with "newsroom". >>> we are going to take you to l
, we'll bring that to you live. in japan today here, the focus really is on this number 3 reactor. that is where we saw the video. you see it here of these helicopters dropping water. sea water in this attempt to cool it off and prevent a possible meltdown. tokyo electric or tepco is in this desperate rush to build a power line so the fukushima daiichi plant can power up its cooling systems once again. later on in this newscast, i'll be speaking with a man, an american man who was inside one of the facility, actually in a building next to one of the reactors working when the quake hit last friday. >> cracks were opening up on the ground. i looked over at the buildings around me and glass was breaking, lights, sirens, people screaming. >> can you imagine? he's a software engineer there for a couple weeks working on the power plant's computers. he has not spoken to cn nyet. but he will on this tram. we will also check in with our team in tokyo where shrinking supplies of food and gases are a growing concern. >>> a lot of ground to cover here. right off the bat, i want to show you so
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. a massive military relief and recovery operation is under way in japan this morning, after that 8.9 magnitude earthquake that devastated the island. >>> an explosion at a nuclear power plant has raised fears of a meltdown. hundreds are dead, and that number will most certainly rise. we have full coverage "early" this saturday morning, march 12th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> video from less than 30 hours ago in japan, devastating earthquake, 8.9 magnitude. at this hour the official death toll almost 600. and there are other big problems looming this morning. welcome to "the early show" on this saturday morning, i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we will continue to follow this story as it develops throughout the morning. >> let's get right to the earthquake in japan of course. the quake is the fifth largest in recorded history. it was followed by a 23-foot high tsunami. the official death count is 574 dead. the number expected to rise considerably. almost 600 are still missing. there have been more than 125
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
>>> also, new nuclear concerns in japan that there is a direct connection to the u.s. navy. >>> it's been an anxious morning for some b.a.r.t. comcommuters -- commuters. >>> right now, hundreds of bay area community college students and their supporters are heading north to the state's capitol. "mornings on 2" starts now. >>> well, good morning to you. i'm dave clark. >> i'm tori campbell. it's monday, march 14th. >>> just hours ago, b.a.r.t. took -- took care of one problem. >> sal has more on the coverage. >> what happened? >> the system is running well. allie rasmus has more. >> reporter: well, right now, there are delays of trains coming in san francisco. at the concord station. that brought the strain line and traffic to a complete standstill. news chopper 2 was overhead when it happened. b.a.r.t. officials still don't know why that derailment happened. crews worked overnight to remove the derailed tank -- train. at 4:00 a.m. this morning, the work was complete and selves was restored. back out here live, there were delays. when we talked to commuters this morning, they are re
>>> this morning on "early today," on the verge. japan's nuclear crisis creeps toward catastrophe as a third reactor is rocked by an explosion and a fourth catches fire. >>> nikkei nose dive, japanese stocks go into a free fall when investors panicked by radiation fears. >>> and sticker shock, russia jacks up the price of flying >>> and sticker shock, russia jacks up the price of flying american astronauts into space. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today, we begin with a nuclear nightmare. radiation levels spiked in japan this morning in a wake of series of explosions at the puck chic ma nuclear power plant. days after suffering its most crippleling catastrophe ever, japan is now facing the world's largest nuclear disaster since chernobyl. kristin dal again reports. >> reporter: japanese officials warned the radiation leaks were getting worse after a explosion in a third reactor and a fire in the fourth. the prime minister warned they were expanding the area of evacuation to 19 miles reporting radiation levels seemed very
are still feeling after shocks, including chris barnes, a u.s. student studying in japan and joins us now on the phone. can you hear me. >> i can hear you, kelly, good afternoon. >> kelly: you sound loud and clear. good afternoon to you as well. you're still feeling after shocks there? >> indeed i am. we've been having aftershocks, two to three an hour, since the first quake struck. >> kelly: where are you staying right now, trent? >> at the moment i'm in tokoyo, in my apartment on top of my building on the 12th floor and i would say compared to the ground floor, the shaking is stronger up here. >> kelly: you can feel the swaying and it's got to make you feel uncomfortable? >> well, look, i grew up in los angeles and i experienced the 1994 north ridge earthquake and it absolutely pales in pair son, the north ridge earthquake compared to what i experienced in tokoyo. >> kelly: how many people here in the united states recall the north ridge earthquake in 1994. as you were saying and this one is far worse. and we've seen the devastation hereof the tsunami. were you a witness to any of that?
. >> i think the events unfolding in japan incidence actually appear to be more serious than three mile island. to what extent we don't really know now. so as their unfolding very rapidly on an hour by hour, day-by-day basis and there are conflicting reports. we don't really know in detail what's happening. >> we're at a moment in time where, obviously, all of us are heartbroken by the images of what the happening in japan. we're reminded of how american leadership is critical to our closest allies even if those allies are economically advanced and powerful, there are moments when we need our help and we're bound together by a common humanity. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." a live look at times square. it is thursday, march 17th, st. patrick's day, with us on set, pulitzer prize-winning historian, jon meacham, the chairman of deutsch incorporated, donny deutsch and columnist for "the new york times," nicholas kristof. also in washington, msnbc contributor mike barnicle. a lot going on today. japan looking graver and graver by the moment. >> certainly is. it seems, there's been
, for continuing coverage. captioning by, closed captioning services, inc. >> eric: a "fox news alert," could japan be teetering on the edge of a nuclear disaster, reeling from the devastating earthquake and tsunami? the nuclear concerns are bringing new worries, this morning that the crisis in the country could get worse and there could be another big earthquake. hello, i'm eric sean, on this busy sunday morning. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby. japan's prime minister is now calling the crisis there, one of the worst since the endf world war ii. they are worried about possible melt downs and potential for an explosion at nuclear reactors, along the northeast earn coast. and, more than 170,000 people evacuating the area, where authorities fear now more than 10,000 people have already died from the quake and a wall of water that rushed right through. david piper on the ground, streaming live with the latest from tokyo. david, give us the latest. what is the situation, with the nuclear scare? >> reporter: well, jamie, there's a real fear that there could be a nuclear melted down, the latest we have is the
>>> this morning on "early today," desperate measures. the world watches and waits as japan tries to contain its nuclear crisis. >>> survival instinct, incredible new video of heroic rescues during last week's catastrophic tsunami. >>> and royal jewel, the see-through dress that caught a prince's eye sells for a see-through dress that caught a prince's eye sells for a whopping sum. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today, we begin with a race against the clock. japan is desperately trying to reconnect power to critical cooling systems at the fukushima power plant. this as smoke has once again been seen rising from the crippled nuclear facility. nbc's brian moore reports. >> reporter: tons of water, the difference between salvation and catastrophe at japan's stricken nuclear plant. >> the situation remains very serious. but there's been no significant worsening since yesterday. the cloud billowing from the fukushima plant on wednesday was all but gone thursday, but the possibility of a meltdown is still very real. president ob
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
countries like japan -- excuse me -- china and india. there is not a lot of overlap in those the use -- those views. you have an opportunity to agree with steve and me to come back where we can -- to come back to where we can get things done. you can make the case in a practical sense of what difference transit and your investment has made in your community, what difference it makes in terms of the fabric of the community, the environment, being able to deal with social equity. you have a case to make. i am proud of what we have done in portland, oregon over the last 30 years. transit made it possible for portland to be the nation's most popular european city. there is a joke about young people going there to retire. but the quality of life is good enough that people feel like they are retiring. we have an opportunity to stress in our downtown, our neighboring community. we give people transportation choices. there has been spectacular re- investment that would not have been possible had it not been for transit. we need you to advocate for what transit means to you now and what it wi
in chile the president travels to el salvador. >>> to japan now. this morning workers are evacuated, or were evacuated from the tsunami stricken fukushima daiichi nuclear plant and smoke was seen rising from one of the reactors. there's been a dramatic jump in the estimated death toll from that massive earthquake and tsunami eleven days ago. police now estimate more than 18,000 people were killed. charlie d'agata has the story. >> reporter: beneath this pile of rubble a much-needed sign of hope. crews pulled an 80-year-old woman and her teenage grandson out alive, nine days after japan's earthquake and tsunami destroyed their home. reports say the two had been trapped in their kitchen, and survived by eating yogurt and other food found in the refrigerator. the dramatic rescue provided a rare bit of good news for a nation reeling from its worst disaster since world war ii. positive developments also emerged from the fukushima nuclear power plant, where engineers are racing to prevent a full-blown meltdown. two of the facility's six reactors are now under control. and crews plan to so
of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertaint
, and los angeles are joining rescuers from japan and other countries. highly drained dogs are able to detect live victims who might be buried in the debris. the teams land the at a u.s. air base about 150 miles north of sendai. >>> the nuclear fears from this crisis in japan are only raising concerns here in the u.s. what if such a disaster ever hit us here at home? david kerley has more on that. >> reporter: japan had never declared a nuclear emergency. it is dealing with six runaway reactors. two in dire shape. >> two reactors now where we have core that is partially melted. this is unprecedented. >> reporter: the good news, inside those buildings, the hot nuclear cores and their primary containment housings are said to be intact. but with no electricity, the japanese are reportedly using firetrucks, taking the drastic step of pumping sea water into the cores and flooding the containment housings of both reactors. a last-ditch effort to cool the cores to stop the nuclear reaction. >> we are at a reactor tipping point. either over the next 24 to 48 hours they'll get coal of these
might be helping you if you are looking for ways to help the victims in japan. we set up a phone bank this morning to make sure you have an easy way to donate to organizations helping in the recovery efforts in japan. call the number on your screen, 202-895-3307. again the number is 202-895- 3307. we have representatives from the adventist development and relief agency, the baptist world alliance, the salvation army, world vision and the universal relief team. when you call, your organization will go to the charity who answers the phone unless you specify a specific charity. >>> and first let's look at our forecast with tony. >> hi, allison and good morning, everybody. i told you we would have partial sunshine this morning and we do. we will see changing conditions during the course of the day. more clouds later and rainfall too. let's look at hd radar and the rain is a ways away. we have a mix of clouds and sun. sunrise i think occurs at 7:20 this morning. so the rain is not nearby. later on i think we could see a few rain showers develop during the course of the afternoon but the mo
>>> all right, the united states now advising americans to leave japan and warning those with travel plans to stay away. >>> evacuations have been authorized at issue, the radiation risk and what many fear is not being said about it. >>> also following a developing story here at home. hazmat crews called to a montgomery county neighborhood after the explosion of night. fox 5 morning news -- overnight. fox 5 morning news continues now at 6:00. >>> a take a look from the tower cam over wisconsin avenue this morning, northwest washington on this thursday morning, march 17th. 2011. good morning and happy st. patrick's day. thanks for waking up with fox 5 morning news. i'm steve cheveney. >> and i'm sarah simmons, the forecast with tony perkins, we're slap happy. >> that impacts it as well and certainly -- things have been tough so it's nice to look forward to something like the nice happy day. and i think we will have that as far as our weather goes, in fact, i want to start and right to it. the st. patrick's day forecast. yeah. for those of you marking the day and with any
news. >> japan faces mounting emergencies from friday's disasterrous quake and tsunami. the death toll there is soring and officials are responding to another explosion at a power plant. good evening. i'm heather holmes. >> i'm ken wayne. we will have the latest in a moment. first developing news in the east bay before bart crews working to restore service after a train derailment. the aftermath of the derailment that left two cars jack knifed near the concord station. right now workers trying to clear the tracks to restore train service but will they have the job done in time for tomorrow morning? deborah has been monitoring the situation all night and is live with the very latest. >> reporter: they are going to be out here working all night long. take a look. they have a huge crane and behind those bushes are the tracks and the cars that they need to get realigned. right now there is no service east of pleasant hill either direction and there may not be for monday's rush unless they beat the clock. a huge clean is here to pluck two 70-foot bart cars off the tracks and set them down
't believe the velocity of the huge stories. first and foremost in japan. >> we start with the latest on the devistration in japan. there is another major exexplosion in fukushima, wrap jap. water levels are far enough allow to partially showing the rods. sparking fears of another melt down. >> and bodies have been found in mlyangi. >> stock tock closed down over there six percent. >> u.s. naval forces are moving away from japan over fears of troops exposed to dangerous radiation particularly on the uss regan. >> rescue relief remains top priority but thousands of people are evacuated near the fukushima nuclear plant. if you look at it. second hydrogen explosion to rock the plant and the massive cloud of smoke is carrying radioactive conitalination and that is a concern for the u.s. naval ship providing humanitarian assistance. that affects uss ronald reagan a hundred miles from the plant. they detected low levels of radiation and prompted the ship to move further out to sea. in fact, the commander of the fleet. vice admiral, reveals that the ships are being temporarily repositioned a
that at least one of the reactors at japan's fukushima power plant is leaking. officials have found plutonium around the plant, and highly radioactive water has been discovered for the first time outside the building. the tokyo electric power company, tepco, maintains it poses no health risk to humans. we have this report. >> plutonium habeen found in five spots around fukushima, but tepco insists the levels are not harmful. >> the level detective is extremely small and will not affect human health. -- the level detected. >> they were trying to stay on top of the situation. now, a government reesentative is says that there may have been a partial meltdown inside reactor number two, this after water rose to more than 100,000 times its normal level over the weekend. they now have to pump out the contaminated water before they continue to work on reestablishing the cooling system. engineers can only spend a few minutes at a time in the reactor buildings due to the radiation levels. >> when you are inside, you are coaminated by radiation. i was exposed over five days. the longer you spend inside,
>>> a devastating earthquake triggers a tsunami that slams into japan. >> killing others and carrying away homes, cars and buildings, putting the west coast of the u.s. on a tsunami watch. >> hi. i'm kai jackson. >> and i'm mary mary bubala. here's what people are talking about. >>> one of the biggest earthquakes ever unleashes a tsunami on japan. and it is putting the nations around the pacific ocean on alert. sandra hughes has concerns on the u.s. west coast. yet we begin with randall pinkston, reporting for wjz on the widespread devastation. >> reporter: the massive tsunami swallowed entire villages on japan's northeast coast and left others burning through the night. the 23-foot wave, triggered by the largest ever in japan, swept away by cars, boats. in one coastal town alone, 1800 homes were badly damaged or destroyed. they have recovered 300 bodies. hundreds more are missing. the quake centered around northeast of tokyo. >> it was so strong. and the undulation of the earth was so powerful that we actually had to kind of hang onto the outside of our house. >> reporte
>>> good morning. breaking news. japan's nuclear crisis takes a dire turn. high levels of radiation spewing from the damaged nuclear plant following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. an official is calling it, quote, a very bad scerio as officials work to contain the risk today, tuesday, march 15, officials work to contain the risk today, tuesday, march 15, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> officials in japan are saying the radiation leaking from the crippled nuclear power plant is enough to impact human health. >> the big concern is the number 2 reactor which exploded on monday sending more radiation into the air and then a fire at reactor 4 broke out. that one had been shut down for maintenance before the quake. all but 50 employees of the plant have been evacuated. in a nationally televised address japan's prime minister urged anyone living near the plant who had not already evacuated to seal themselves indoors and warned of the very high risk of more leaks. >> you hear
from tide. >>> a busy three hours. following the latest developments out of japan and libya and that will continue. see you on monday. have a great weekend. >> "cnn newsroom" with carol costello starts right now. >> thank you. 9:00 a.m. on the east coast and 6:00 a.m. on the west and i'm carol costello sitting in for kyra phillips. >>> two huge stories echoing around the world. in japan new developments in the nuclear crisis and a new measure how dangerous the situation is. >>> in libya the world takes action against a dictator and the fear he could slaughter his own people. we are looking at the no-fly zone, the united states role in that and the military strikes that could begin at any time. >>> there are quickly developing events in the libyan civil war. libya's foreign minister has just announced an immediate cease-fire. the move comes after the u.n. security council approved a no-fly zone and that cleared the way for possible military action against moammar gadhafi's regime. a french official today said strikes will take place swiftly. the mood in the rebel held city of
. >> was the interview sunday night. -- watch the interview sunday night. >> could it congressional hearing on japan's nuclear plant today -- gregory jaszco said japanese emergency workers at one plant could face lethal levels of radiation while of it -- while advising americans to evacuate a wider area. this is two hours. >> we have a true expert and we feel very blessed that you could be here until the chairman comes. we will do this by order of arrival, back and forth, democrat-republican. but i will give each member 10 minutes so that we can press on some of these issues without having to rush hour questions. we are here to give a briefing on the ongoing crisis at the nuclear plant in japan. we will have a second panel including mr. anthony -- oh, boy, senior vice president and scientists.ar vic i appreciate all of our people ticking time out of their busy schedules. i know you're on television, answering questions, really teaching wallace -- teaching all of us the lessons that we have to take away from what is happening. the devastation in japan is heartbreaking. our thoughts and prayers go out
factual question which may be of interest of people watching relating to japan. there's been concern, and i think a certain amount of confusion about what the potential danger is to the u.s. from the nuclear plant problems in japan, and particularly as the media's been following the last few days and a sense that the possibility of a meltdown at the plant, the explosion, and emission of a large amount of radioactivity and people are concerned about the west coast of the u.s., particularly hawaii, guam, and other islands may be subject to some danger, and i wonder if you have a current sense of what that possibility is? >> i'll refer back to the statement made by the chairman of nuclear regulatory commission in looking at all the scenarios, they do not see radiation reaching the u.s. that it would be of a danger or require protective angsts, but anticipation of this, fema support with the department of energy have a system called rad net. it's been there and 24 hours a day, seven days a week monitors various channels, air, water, other types of things across the country, and so if we
about the creation of a new financial regulatory agency. nucleare on at japan's power plant. the head of the nuclear regulatory commission discussed the emergency there, which may have exposed workers to lethal doses of radiation. this is the second part of a hearing on the house energy subcommittee. it is an hour and a half. >> i will call the meeting back to in order. you were called away for a meeting. everybody has given their opening statements. i would recognize you for 5 minutes for your opening statement. >> thank you to you, mr. chairman, you and the other chairman of the subcommittees. and other members of the subcommittee. i am honored to appear before you on behalf of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. given the events unfolding overseas, my remarks will focus on the events in japan. i will be happy to answer questions on those matters. i would like to offer my condolences to all those affected by the earthquake and tsunami in japan over the last few days. my heart goes out to those dealing with the aftermath of these disasters. i want to indulge the tireless efforts
personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regime's ground troops are working and coalition forces are ready to expand the u.n.'s no fly zone t
that the damaged nuclear power plant in japan, quote come continues to further stabilize, and that there have been no radiation readings in the u.s. the might be of concern. these remarks came before the meeting of the senate energy and natural resources committee. other speakers included officials from the energy department, the nuclear energy institute and the union of concerned scientists. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> thank you for being here. this is a briefing. this is not a hearing has such. the reason we try to it as a briefing is so that people wouldn't have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all of that and things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation that the nuclear power plant. will the committee doesn't have direct oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants we do have to consider how events such as those affect the ability of the nation's nuclear fleet of 104 reactors to supply electricity, this of course the 104 reactors currently account for 20% of the electricity that we use and with the future of nuclear energy will be as part
, where simple goodness begins. >>> off the top, the earthquake in japan overnight. there are tsunami warnings across the pacific from russia to california. good morning. i'm steve chenevey. >> good morning. i'm gurvir dhindsa. we want to go straight to our top story. there is now a major rescue operation in tokyo and other cities. authorities say there are no leaks from nuclear plants so far. >> tens of thousands of people stranded in trains in tokyo. we are all getting reports of at least 32 deaths. that number expected to go up though. the 8.9 earthquake, the largest to hit japan in 100 years. the government now calling for international assistance. look at all those cars there in the water with the boats. the u.s. ambassador in japan says the united states is ready to help. >> the pictures coming from there absolutely increedible. the big story for us here at home, the heavy rain that we had in the last 24 to 48 hours. here is a live look from canal road which is closed and it remains closed this morning as a result of flooding and mudslides in that area. we still have a lot of po
. >>> death and devastation in japan after that monster earthquake and tsunami. as many as 10,000 people are now feared dead. >>> the clean-up at the tsunami- damaged santa cruz harbor is expected to last for days and we'll show you what salvage crews are facing tonight. >>> off-track, big problem for b.a.r.t. riders and the situation fixed in time for the morning commute. >>> complete bay area news coverage starts right now. this is kutv channel 2 news at 5:00. >>> b.a.r.t. is using buss for shuttle passengers between the pleasant hill and pittsburg-bay point station. kutv's john sasaki has been talking to bart officials will the problem and the solution. john. >> reporter: heather, we're standing outside the concord b.a.r.t. station and look up there and you can see what is still a twisted mess. almost nine hours after this train derailed. although we just learned that crane is too small for this job, so i so a bigger one must be brought in. three people were taken to the hospital with minor injuries. a san francisco-bound b.a.r.t. train derailed at 9:20 this morning giving
, chuck and savannah. >>> in japan, teams head back into the crippled nuclear plant after a radiation surge forced the 50 workers out. a slow moving nightmare. >>> flash point in bahrain. at least six people dead after riot police drive out protesters. saudi troops are on the ground and now, the iranians are speaking out. >>> and a budget passes the house, but a possibility of a government shutdown actually really looms now. i know we've said it before, but we mean it this time. savannah is on assignment. let's get to the rundown. we're going to begin in japan where workers are in a desperate race to cool the six reactors before one or maore erupt into full squal meltdown. these are new images out this morning showing extensive damage to three of the four reactors. smoke poured from one while a fire burned at another. radiation levels rose so high that those 50 workers had to be pulled out. the concrete and steel surrounding two of the cores may have been breached. radiation levels south of the plant spiked at 300 times the normal level. today, officials say the level rs stable now. a
from where we left off on friday. >> breaking news from japan. >> smoke spotted coming from a damaged nuclear reactor. engineers are struggling there to prevent a meltdown after a devastating earthquake and tsunami earlier this month. let's get to anna coren. i understand it's now been evacuated. what's going on there? >> reporter: that's exactly right, ali. they thought they were getting a handle on the situation, that it was stable until about 4:00 p.m. this afternoon. that was when they saw gray smoke coming from reactor number three. that's been a reactor that was a huge problem. where they think there are low levels o of water in the pools that house the spent fuel rods. so when the smoke came at 4:00 p.m. this afternoon, it only took about 15 minutes before they decided they needed to get the workers out of there straight away into another building. there are some 430 workers at the fukushima daiichi power plant. we don't know how many were involved in reactor three. and we don't have any reports of, you know, severe exposure to radiation or injuries. we are working to get those
people will be talking about today. a race against the clock is continuing in japan as the damaged nuclear reactors continue to heat up. the u.s. is ordering people who live within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate or stay indoors, twice the dangerous zone reported by the japanese. here's charlie d'agata. >> reporter: military helicopters launched an all out water assault pan japan's crippled nuclear power plant. crews are racing to finish a new power line that could restore crucial water pumps, the best option to cool dangerously hot reactors and prevent a nuclear meltdown. >> my confidence is eroded because of this continual almost daily degradation of the structure they have there. >> reporter: the facility has been plagued by a series of explosions and fires sense last week's earthquake and tsunami knocked out power. newly released images shows the damage to reactor four. japan is denying u.s. claims that same reactor has no more water in the spent fuel pools, meaning there's nothing to keep the fuel rods from melting down. >> we believe radiation levels are extremely high whic
. the massive tsunami working its way through japan. these are some of the most incredible pictures we've seen from sendai japan. charlie d'agata has more. >> reporter: it looks like -- a wall of water raced across the farmlands sweeping cars and buildings aside. a massive earthquake triggered a tsunami that washed away everything in its path. the cars bobbed in the port city. as another wave sparked near sendai. one oil refinery was also struck. a government spokesman urged people to stay calm. office workers were caught in swaying buildings in the capital. japan's prime minister was addressing parliament the moment it hit. they're used to earthquakes in japan, but this was the largest in 140 years. >>> the warning center issued a warning for hawaii stretching to taiwan and indonesia and russia, columbia and peru. there was a tsunami watch for the western coast of the united states and canada from the mexican border to alaska. the height of the waves could be highier than some low lying places in the pacific. the un has 30 search and rescue teams are on alert. >> the event is taking japan by
to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
, for the struggling people of japan. nbc news with americans on a mission to provide critical relief. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it has turned into a big military effort, bombs and cruise missiles have been raining down on libya, and it could get even bigger and the stakes are high. it's been a mostly u.s. run air campaign thus far, but tonight a change is coming. a hand-over to nato for the supervision of this strike. even though the pentagon warned libya today, quote, we will continue to hit you, the u.s. is anxious to shift some of this to somebody else. and just as there have been new and loud explosions in tripoli this evening, there are late developments in this story tonight. we want to begin our coverage with our chief foreign affairs correspondent, andrea mitchell. good evening. >> reporter: after another day of high-stakes, diplomatic wrangling, the u.s. has gotten the allies to agree nato will take command of the libyan military operation, at least the no-fly zone. the president back in the white house after his trip to lati
>>> good morning. one week after the devastating quake and tsunami that ravaged japan, smoke continues to pour from a crippled nuclear power plant there, as the government raises the level of danger. the first american evacuees have been flown out of the country. while president obama is urging west coast residents not to worry about radiation plume expected to reach the u.s. later today. >>> also this morning another major story unfolding. the u.n. backed libya's rebels approving a no-fly zone and clearing the path for military action against moammar gadhafi as early as today. we'll bring you the very latest from both libya and japan, "early" this friday morning, march 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you, i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. good morning to you. following two major stories on the "early" show this morning. >> of course we're looking at japan. but libya, as we mentioned briefly, the u.n. security council voting to approve that no-fly zone. as you can imagine, there are some strong reaction from moamma
evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situation and see in a larger military presence may be needed. also
for joining us on friday morning. japan now classifies the incident in the fukushima power plant as a level 5. it could have have consequences and cause deaths. this as the death tollrises to 6500 confirmed dead and more than 10,000 people missing. smoke seen rising from unit two. it could be from an explosion in the earlier part of the week. workers are trying to restore power so they can cool the reactors and they are doing that today. radiation from the plant is expected to hit the west coast of the united states with lemps that are expected to be minimal. gm is suspending operations in the plant in indiana because of shortage of car parts coming from japan. >> brian: so much coming, the yap jap asked the u.s. for help in getting the nuclear power plant under control as designed by general electric. david piper has the latest on that part of the story, david? >>reporter: yes, good morning. there is a massive military effort to help the japanese people. over50,000 members of the military are involved in this operationn. in the kyoto air base where i am standing now. supplis and help pushing
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 378 (some duplicates have been removed)